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How small changes create big value

In 2008, UPS upgraded its routing software to discourage drivers from turning right across traffic (or left in the US). It was a small change that created massive savings in time, fuel, car accidents and money. In fact, UPS estimates this one change saves them more than $300 million per year.

You might not run a courier business or invest as much in technology as UPS but the same principles still apply. Using technology, small changes can create big improvements in efficiency and service quality.

Through the Digital Champions Club (DCC) we help growing businesses use a ‘small changes’ mindset to take their technology to the next level. And each quarter a small number of guests get to come and experience the program first hand. The next opportunity is on Friday, March 6 in Melbourne.

“The hardest part was making it think more like a driver and less like a computer.”
– Jack Levis, UPS Senior Director of Process Management.

You do not have to be a technology expert to join the DCC. We support both business people to get technology and technology people to get business.

If 2020 is the year you want to move your business from an ad-hoc to systematised approach to technology please get in touch.

Altruism is dead. Long live altruism.

There’s not a lot I remember from my first year of university but one thing that stuck is our inability to prove altruism. Altruism is the idea we could do something that is completely selfless. Yet when we act selflessly there is almost always a potential benefit that flows back to us, whether it be reputation, respect or just the release of brain chemicals that make us feel good about ourselves.

I most recently experienced this at an event I was speaking at last week in Vietnam. The Genesys CX Leaders Council event had C Suite executives fly in from across the Asia Pacific region to share stories and ideas on how to create great customer experience. Yet the whole afternoon on the first day of the event was spent working on community based CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) activities. These activities had delegates either constructing play equipment and painting at a nearby children’s community centre or building bicycles to be donated to a local charity that supported children saved from human trafficking. Participating in these activities felt great and provided a nice change from the normal ‘action packed’ conferences I speak at.

Although their generosity is not to be understated, it is also true that Genesys doesn’t run these activities for completely altruistic reasons. These activities provide delegates the chance to talk and build relationships in a way that most conferences don’t provide. In doing so, they provide the opportunity for more open and valuable business conversations to take place, which in turn resulted in value to delegates. The value to delegates ultimately reflects well on Genesys who enabled all this to take place. Although perhaps not intended to be altruistic, Genesys’s approach highlights that we can do well by doing good.

A little closer to home, I have seen a similar pattern play out with the Digital Champions Club scholarships we launched last year. Initially intended as a way of providing help and support to Not-For-Profits and other values-driven organisations, the scholarships have also resulted in significant benefit to the rest of the digital champions community. I think the whole community has wanted to see the scholarships recipients succeed and in turn the recipients have sought to provide value and energy back to the community. Without a doubt, the energy and culture within the program is the best it’s ever been.

Applications for the 2020 scholarships open next week and I’d encourage you to help out deserving organisations by sharing this with your network. Not for altruistic reasons obviously, but because we are all selfish, self-centred scoundrels who only do things that benefit ourselves.

Now click share and feel that oxytocin hit kick in!

Get your copy of the 2020 Scholarship Information Pack by signing up at www.digitalchampionsclub.com.au/scholarship and learn more details to guide you through your application process.

Digital Champions Scholarships: Half the cost, twice the value

Twelve months ago, I decided to offer a series of scholarships to my Digital Champions Club. The decision was based on conversations with my good friend Mykel Dixon who strongly felt that the people who most deserve to be in a program are sometimes people who can’t afford it. With the support of my fellow coaches, Kate Fuelling and Gabe Alves, we offered two half and one full 12-month scholarship to the program.

The outcome has been A-MAZ-ING

Not only have we had the opportunity to support three incredible Not-for-Profit organisations, their champions have delivered back to both their organisations and the program in spades. Their enthusiasm has been infectious and their energy levels have been off the charts. It’s as if the scholarships have provided them an opportunity and they aren’t going to waste it. They might be paying half the cost (or none of it) but through their effort and commitment they seem to be getting twice the value.

It is for that reason Kate, Gabe and I are pumped to be launching our scholarship program for 2020. Scholarships are open to Australian Not-for-Profits and other values-driven organisations (you don’t need to have any particular status, you just need to be doing meaningful work). Applications open on the 1st October and run through until the 31st of October but if you’re interested in applying (or know someone who is) we encourage you to start the ball rolling earlier rather than later. Joining the Digital Champions Club requires a significant internal commitment and the sooner you get started the sooner you’ll be ready.

To make it easier for potential applicants, we’ve created an information pack that can be sent to your inbox, printed (if necessary), and shared with potential sponsors and other stakeholders.

Finally, if you don’t work for a suitable organisation but you know someone who does I encourage you to forward this email on or use the share buttons below to help spread the word.

Let’s get this message out to the people who deserve it the most!

Just in case you need any further motivation check out this testimonial video from Julia Gregg from Contemporary Arts Precinct Ltd.

 

 

PS – If you’ve already signed up to receive updates on the scholarships we will shoot you out a copy of the Information Pack via email.

Find out what makes you common, not what makes you unique

We live in a society that values individuality both in our personal and professional lives. Personal Branding and Unique Selling Propositions are all the rage, but there is at least one area where we are better off seeking out what we have in common with others – rather than what makes us special.

 
Technology.
 
If we look at most of the good apps and software available to us, they generally do one thing really well: Dropbox excels at making it easy to share files with others, Gmail allows us easily receive, manage and send messages, and although I’m not a huge fan, Microsoft Word does a good job of dividing up information into A4 size chunks and sharing them in a way that most other people will be able to access and open.
 
This is in no way an accident. The value proposition for software developers relies on identifying a task their software can do better than others, charge a very small amount of money for it (and probably throw in a free option), and do it a million times over with low marginal costs. The value proposition for almost every software or app developer on the planet is reliant on scale, and therefore commonality. In fact, the general rule for startups is that unless you can have 10,000 active users (which means 10,000 people who all want to do exactly the same thing) then you don’t have something worth investing in.
 
The benefits of commonality and using off the shelf solutions are numerous. 
 
  1. If you find a problem for which there’s already an established solution, then it’s likely you have an actual problem rather than an assumed problem.
  2. The time and cost of developing a solution is greatly reduced if someone has already gone ahead and done it for you. This in turn means that you can solve the problem and generate a return faster.
  3. The competition amongst developers within a particular specialisation means that they have thought far more about required functionality and usability than you have.
  4. The cost of maintaining the solution is greatly reduced because you’re sharing development costs across all users instead of just one.
  5. You can learn from the experience of other users before you. If you’re unique, then you will be making all the mistakes yourself. When you seek out commonality, you can learn from all the mistakes that everyone else has already made. This greatly reduces the risk of implementation and dramatically improves the value proposition.
 
So how is it that we reconcile our uniqueness with the need for commonality?
At a strategic level we need to be able to understand what differentiates our organisation from others. Delivering against our strategy is generally achieved through a series of objectives. Those objectives will consist of multiple activities and we can break down activities into a collection of tasks. It is not at the strategic level, but rather at the task level we should be seeking commonality with others.
 
The ability to find commonality with other organisations and identifying mutual technology opportunities is key to the value proposition of the Digital Champions Club. It allows members to identify new opportunities, reduces risk and leads to faster and more successful implementation. Members of the program explicitly commit to sharing the projects they’re working on and as a result, we now have a shared library of over 100 projects that have been investigated and/or implemented by members of the program. And perhaps 70% or more of those are ones where they could (or have) be copied by another organisation in a different industry with completely different objectives.
 
That’s the power of finding out what makes you common.

Scholarship applications close in 48 hours

A few weeks back we launched the inaugural scholarships for the Digital Champions Club and now there is just a little over 48 hours before applications close. The scholarships are for not-for-profit and for-purpose organisations who want to access the support, accountability and a community of like minded organisations to help them implement their technology projects.

To spread the word and help make sure that this opportunity finds the right organisations we have been playing a game called #passiton. All that we ask is that you pass on this message to three people that you think might benefit from being a part of the Digital Champions Club. With so little time left this is perhaps our last opportunity to get the word out there. So if you haven’t already done so, please take moment to think about the charities, causes and other initiatives you would like to succeed and pass this along.

All the information about the scholarships can be found at digitalchampionsclub.com.au/scholarships

Thanks for sharing

Simon

The challenge of explaining what you do

I had an awkward moment with a close friend recently. I’ve known Harsha for more than a decade and she’s someone I’ve leaned on every now and then for marketing advice around the various programs I offer. The awkward moment arose because, after five years of telling Harsha about the Digital Champions Club, she still had to ask me what it was exactly that I do.

At the time I found it quite disheartening, that someone who is clearly switched on, someone who genuinely cares about me and what I do, someone who I’ve spent hours talking to about my work still didn’t have any real clarity about what the Digital Champions Club is or why it exists.

My initial response was a sense of frustration — initially directed outwards at Harsha’s failure to listen, and then directed inwards at my own inability to clearly articulate my proposition. So why is it that we struggle to convey things clearly?

I think firstly it’s because it’s hard to get out of our own heads. What I mean by this is it’s hard to explain things without the context of a whole bunch of other stuff that may also need explaining but that you aren’t aware enough to realise. As a result, the explanations which sound whole and well rounded to us are hollow and incomplete to others.

Second, I think the packaging can get in the way of the product. Our desire to create things that are unique, memorable and exciting brings us to use language that is unnecessarily complex and difficult to follow. Unless it’s meant to be a genuine surprise, perhaps it’s best that we dispense with some of the gift wrapping.

Thirdly, and perhaps most importantly, I feel like a bit of a dick talking about myself. Which means I generally don’t do it, and therefore when I do it’s all a little off the cuff and just kind of sounds a bit awkward, which in turn makes me feel like a bit of a dick…and the cycle continues.

So Harsha set me a challenge: articulate the Digital Champions Club in a way that people could actually understand and then share it with all the other people who, like her, are currently unsure of what it is I do.

I’ve been procrastinating on this for a couple of weeks because, apart from the dislike of talking about myself, it feels a little awkward to be openly broadcasting my inherent uncertainty and lack of clarity in a world where ‘experts’ are meant to have endless reserves of both.

Yet perhaps in a small way this is a form of therapy, so Harsha, after hours of struggle and refinement here it goes….

I support small and medium-sized organisations who are struggling to build momentum in the delivery of their technology projects (sometimes referred to as digital transformation). I do this through a combination of monthly coaching (to provide support and accountability), one day workshops (for deep learning) and peer-to-peer sharing (to reduce risk). Collectively, these are delivered as a technology-focused, continuous improvement program called the Digital Champions Club.

So how did I do? No, honestly, I’d genuinely like to know…and it really does still sound hollow and incomplete (or even if it doesn’t) feel free to download it my latest white paper “When Technology Fails to Deliver” which explains a whole bunch of the other stuff that goes around in my head.

P.S. I’ve already been back into LinkedIn to edit this…twice.

News from the Digital Champions Club

Normally I’m not one for much self promotion but I’ve mentioned the Digital Champions Club a few times recently and want to give you a peek behind the curtain so you can see what’s being going down.

Curious? Read on!

Damn it, I have some other pressing spam messages to delete but what the heck

We held our first Digital Champions Club Boot camp for seven enterprising digital champions at the beginning of March. The event included the extraordinary Mykel Dixon hosting a conversation about culture and purpose, the enigmatic Paul Gaudion discussing digital projects at John Holland and the wonderful Kate Fuelling helping mentor and support members. Thankfully, we also had Dave Dixon there to capture the event on film and he’s pulled together a short video which brilliantly captures the intent of the Digital Champions Club…in under 1 minute. Take a look.

And everything now looks shinier

Whilst this has all being going on behind closed doors we have also been working on changing things out the front. To make it easier for SMEs to connect the dots between their people, work and technology, we’ve just launched a new website (you can check it out at digitalchampionsclub.com.au) and added some great new events…and the first of these is completely free.

Yes, some things are free…

Every few weeks I will be hosting a virtual conversation with small business owners on how to identify the next generation of digital opportunities for their organisation.

You can find out more by visiting the website and clicking on ‘Join in the Conversation’. Each virtual conversation is limited to just 20 participants to give space for interaction and questions so it would be wise to book early to get your preferred date and time.

…but others are not

Apart from the free virtual conversations, I will be hosting a series of breakfasts at the end of May for organisations who want to take the next step in identifying and developing their digital champions. The ‘Breakfast of Champions’ will be held in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane and will cost $79 for a double ticket including breakfast and a copy of my new book The Digital Champion: Connecting the dots between people, work and technology.

We will have the dates finalised shortly, but if you are interested please email me so you are at the top of the list once the events are launched.

Did you say a new book?

Yes I did. Almost a year to the day after publishing Analogosaurus: Avoiding Extinction in a World of Digital Business I am just finishing the final draft of The Digital Champion: Connecting the dots between people, work and technology. In a way the first book was a book for the managers and executives who needed a gentle shove towards embracing a digital future, the second one is a practical guide that shows organisations how to do it.

If you would like to make a small contribution to the book, you could help by giving your feedback on the cover design. I’m currently running a design contest on 99 Designs and you can have your say here.

Events

SEPT ’20 Bootcamp – LIVE STREAM

 

The live stream is hosted on Zoom. If you haven’t previously used Zoom you might wish to download and install it before the bootcamp.

 

You will be emailed access links and other information prior to the bootcamp.

 

JUN ’19 Bootcamp – PERTH

Saxons Perth
7 June 2019, Friday
8.00am to 3.00pm WST

Wilson Parking Central Park Car park
151-158 St Georges Terrace, Perth
Click here for rates.

Wilson Parking Queen’s Complex Car park
Corner Wellington Street and Queen Street, Perth, WA, 6000
Click here for rates.

Wilson Parking The Esplanade Car park
18 The Esplanade, Perth, WA, 6000
Click here for rates.

MAR 2020 Bootcamp – MELBOURNE

6 March 2020
Friday 10.00am to 5.00pm (registrations at 9.30am)
*Enter at level 10 and the concierge will help you find what you need.

The closest train stop is Melbourne Central.  If you are driving, paid parking is available at the Melbourne Central shopping centre car park, with entries on both La Trobe and Lonsdale Streets.

Parking rates:
Early Bird Rate: $17 when you enter before 10am and leave after 3pm
Standard Rate: $14 per hour
Evening Rate: $12 after 5pm
Maximum Rate: $56 per day