These are thoughts to ponder on relating to connecting the dots between people, work and technology.

Scaffolding Digital Projects

In my last post I talked about the legacy of Zoom and how, suddenly, most of our customers, suppliers and colleagues are feeling quite au fait with video conferencing. But, as I pointed out, Zoom is just one step in the journey of video. Once your organisation has mastered Zoom there are so many other, bigger, and more valuable video-driven opportunities to consider. But what are these opportunities and how do we get there?

Let’s look at this in two parts. First, I’d like to give you an example of a bigger opportunity. Second, we’ll talk a little about how we can build towards it.

So first, here’s a concrete example of a ‘sophisticated’ video project I was recently involved in.

A couple of weeks back I was involved in the delivery of an online event with the crew from Pirate TV (Dave and Mykel Dixon) for RCSA (the Recruitment and Casual Staffing Association of Australia and New Zealand). ‘ReForm’ was a live streamed online event that attracted nearly 500 (paid) attendees, 25 presenters and over five hours of live content (approximately 10% of the content was prerecorded). Although it’s challenging to quantify the value of marketing and promotion, it’s likely the event created more than $100,000 in value between ticket sales and sponsorship opportunities.

But how do you go from a Zoom call to delivering a $100,000 event? The answer is scaffolding.

In no particular order these are the other projects that the Pirate TV team have previously delivered to build the skills and knowledge required for the ReForm event.

  • Videoconferencing internally (Zoom)Videoconferencing with clients
  • Recording our own promotional videos
  • Recording promotional videos for clients
  • Setting up a personal studio
  • Setting up a studio for clients
  • Designing and running own events
  • Designing and running events for clients
  • Designing and running an online event
  • Designing and running own conference (physical)
  • Designing and running a conference for a client (physical)
  • Hosting our own events
  • Hosting events for clients
  • Speaking at client events
  • Live-streaming own physical events
  • Running a distributed online event for ourselves
  • Running a distributed online event for clients
  • Producing a TV show for ourselves
  • Running ReForm

A couple of things to note. First, I didn’t do all these projects myself, some were done by the other members of Pirate TV. Second, most of these were done before COVID. In fact, the only projects that we delivered entirely after COVID were the last four – running distributed online events for ourselves and others (where all the speakers and production crew are in different physical locations), producing a TV show for ourselves and then we ran ReForm.

In many cases, the next project was only incrementally more difficult than the one before. Even still, I imagine this list might feel a little overwhelming. But before you lose heart, the truth is, the ~$100,000 value of ReForm is DWARFED by the value that was generated in getting there. The power of scaffolding is that you don’t need to wait until the end to create value, you can create value along the way. In fact, the power of scaffolding is that you get paid to learn. Each project not only delivers value, it delivers learning and the learning then illuminates the path ahead.


If you want help in scaffolding your video projects in a way that can deliver immediate value, arrange a time to talk about the Digital Champions Club…and if you’d rather just jump to the end and want to deliver an extraordinary online event but without all the time and effort, please get in touch to discuss Pirate TV.

Zoom’s legacy

As social isolation restrictions start to ease across Australia, there are many who are looking forward to getting back to the office…or perhaps more accurately, getting out of the house. There has been much talk about the impact of Zoom (or Teams/Skype/Meet if your organisation is otherwise inclined) on how we work. Most recently, that talk has turned to Zoom fatigue. The feeling that we are all Zoomed out and looking forward to meeting people ‘face to face’ again…or perhaps more accurately ‘body to body’ (as Zoom does faces quite well).

But before we collectively throw away our webcams and relegate our virtual backgrounds to the bin (Mac) or recycling (Windows) let us pause for a moment and consider the legacy that Zoom will leave.
Over the last couple of months everyone has suddenly become very comfortable with videoconferencing. They’ve done it because COVID-19 required flexibility in terms of where people can work from, but its legacy will be much greater than that. Organisations are realising that apart from flexibility, videoconferencing can dramatically reduce travel cost. This is less evident when we talk about getting coworkers together when we could have used the meeting room down the hall but incredibly evident when we think about meeting with geographically dispersed customers or running training workshops for a sales team.

Zoom’s adoption might have been driven by a need for flexibility but its legacy for organisations will be reduced cost, better customer service, and more timely conversations (there is also the potential for a positive legacy for employees, the ability to work remotely and yet still maintain the ability to effectively communicate and collaborate has meant improved work life balance and greater autonomy).

So far, most organisations have been happy to deliver an MVP-Q (Minimum Viable Production Quality) when it comes to videoconferencing. This can be excused because of the operational scramble of the last few weeks, but don’t confuse a proof of concept with the final product. If your business wants to tap into the huge lead generation and cost saving opportunities that videoconferencing can deliver, they will need to lift their game. We have all been inundated with low quality Zoom webinars (I spoke to one colleague who is currently getting 20 invitations a week) and organisations are going to have to get good quickly if they want to stand out.

And if you want to get good at video quickly, you might be interested in the Digital Champions Club. We’ve helped a bunch of organisations get self sufficient in video building the in-house capability for high quality video conferencing, webinars, live training events and content marketing. If that sounds interesting you should get in touch.

Your IT team’s most embarrassing statistic

On Wednesday I sat in on a round table discussion with some of Australia’s top CIOs at ADAPT’s CIO Edge event. Hosted by VMWare, the event started with one of their directors, Andrew Fox, sharing the following statistic:

  • 95% of IT people think they provide employees with the digital tools they need to be successful in their job
  • Only 58% of their employees agree

The problem here isn’t that people can’t always get the latest, shiniest new tech. The problem here is that one group of people think they’ve done their job…and yet the people they serve think they clearly haven’t.

So how can this be so? How can it be that there is such a disconnect? Well I dug up the research report this statistic came from. In it I found another, more embarrassing statistic:

  • 83% of IT people think they give employees a voice when it comes to which digital technologies they can use at work
  • Only 36% of employees agree

WHAT?

First, why don’t 100% of IT people feel they give people a voice? You would think that the person doing the job they’re paid to do would be well qualified to provide input on what tools they need to do it.

Second, if you’re wondering why IT isn’t treated like partners in the business, it’s because close to two thirds of people don’t think you listen. The basis of any partnership, or any meaningful relationship is communication.

Unfortunately, as I sat in this round table I noted there was almost a complete lack of embarrassment on the faces of these CIOs. Even though half of them were statistically doing worse than the figures noted above.

The problem here doesn’t lie with IT people, it lies with the way IT people get trained and developed. As pointed out by Julia Steel at the same event, IT people get trained in cables and code, not in how to have effective conversations. And perhaps a decade ago that was acceptable. The IT people did the IT and the operational people did what they were told. But we now live in a world where employees are more tech savvy than ever and job mobility is at an all time high. Now if you don’t give people the tech they need they leave (or don’t take a job with you in the first place).

It’s no longer enough for IT people to be technically competent. The ability to communicate and collaborate with end users and the ability to work in a team needs to be part of every modern IT person’s skill set.

If they aren’t teaching these skills at university (and a quick review of current IT degrees suggests they aren’t) then this needs to be a priority for the people running IT in every organisation.

Regardless of the size of the business, people need to be able to influence the technology they get.

Three ways technology can help grow your business

It’s no accident that small and medium sized businesses are investing in digital technology. Research by Xero shows businesses who spend the most on technology grow 3x faster than those that spend the least.

These are the three benefits of technology that can help you grow your business:

1. Technology drives productivity. As the production line drove down the cost of making cars, digital is driving down the cost of doing business. Information is the lifeblood of any organisation. It is how we know who is doing what work, for whom and by when. Digital technology streamlines information flows by making it easier to edit, copy, move, use and share.

This means more work can get done faster without increasing the workforce. This drives down costs, improves competitiveness and increases profitability.

2. Technology improves quality and service. Do you remember when you used to wonder if your taxi would come? And now you use Uber. As a general rule people like to get a) what they asked for and b) as soon as possible.

As well as streamlining, digital also means you need to automate information flows. This allows for a more timely, customised, and consistent customer experience. And a better customer experience is key to attracting more customers.

3. Technology means better decisions. We would all agree that more informed decisions are almost always better decisions. And making good business decisions is instrumental in driving growth. Unfortunately, collating all the information you need to make a good decision has a cost. The harder it is to find and analyse the data you need, the less likely you are to do it.

As pointed out above, digital information is easy and fast to edit, copy, move, use, and share. This means business owners can bring together the information they need, when they need it to make smart decisions that will drive growth.

What other ways have you used technology to drive growth in your business?

How small changes create big value

In 2008, UPS upgraded its routing software to discourage drivers from turning right across traffic (or left in the US). It was a small change that created massive savings in time, fuel, car accidents and money. In fact, UPS estimates this one change saves them more than $300 million per year.

You might not run a courier business or invest as much in technology as UPS but the same principles still apply. Using technology, small changes can create big improvements in efficiency and service quality.

Through the Digital Champions Club (DCC) we help growing businesses use a ‘small changes’ mindset to take their technology to the next level. And each quarter a small number of guests get to come and experience the program first hand. The next opportunity is on Friday, March 6 in Melbourne.

“The hardest part was making it think more like a driver and less like a computer.”
– Jack Levis, UPS Senior Director of Process Management.

You do not have to be a technology expert to join the DCC. We support both business people to get technology and technology people to get business.

If 2020 is the year you want to move your business from an ad-hoc to systematised approach to technology please get in touch.

The Paradox of Growth

Alongside profitability, growth is seen as a cornerstone of organisational success. Growth implies market fit — it indicates that the world wants more of what you do. Growth is generally seen as a desirable objective for CEOs and business leaders but there is an underlying paradox to business growth: the more you grow the harder it becomes to grow.

Initially, growth makes things easier. Organisations gain certain benefits as they scale (sometimes referred to as economies of scale). For example, materials can be bought cheaper, machinery and people can be better used, and overhead costs such as rent and utilities can be spread across greater output. All these factors serve to lower the cost of doing work, which in turn makes an organisation more competitive and, as a result, improves profitability.

These benefits generally kick in quickly but then slowly dissipate (you might get a 20% discount if you double an order but you don’t get a 40% discount if you quadruple it). On the other hand, the challenges of growth start slowly but then rise rapidly. These challenges (sometimes referred to as diseconomies of scale) include maintaining communication as an organisation grows, the problems of coordinating the work of more people, more layers of management and slower decision making, and the need for more reporting, checks and balances to ensure the right work is being done in the right way.

Research suggests that as organisations grow, they reach a tipping point where complexity starts growing faster than revenue which leads to decreasing productivity, falling profits, overworked employees, and growing frustration for business owners. Eventually, they reach a point where the cost is greater than what people will pay and there is no point in the organisation growing further.

Unless…

…it can push out the point where things get harder. Obviously some organisations grow very big and very profitable, but they don’t achieve this using the same systems and processes they used when they were small. If an organisation wants to grow to its full potential it will eventually need to rethink how it does its work. Key to this renewal is bringing in the technology solutions that automate, simplify, and streamline work, allowing for further growth without increased headcount and the complexity and challenges it brings with it.

Ideally, this isn’t done when everything is already broken but done on a continual basis. Rather than identifying and fixing the things that are already broken, a continuous approach allows organisations to prepare in advance for the processes and tools they might need in the future. Perhaps the biggest challenges for growing organisations is finding the time and resources to do this proactively. This can be a real challenge when people are already feeling stretched, but committing the time up front is almost always less costly than dealing with the consequences later.

If your organisation is experiencing growing pains and you want to do something about it, consider the benefits of joining The Digital Champions Club, a community of practice that shows you all the tools you need to leverage growth through better technology use.

How complexity kills communication

The network effect is generally seen positively. It refers to the idea that as a network gets bigger it becomes more valuable.

The value of owning the first fax machine is effectively zero because there is no one to send a fax to. But add a second fax machine and there are two faxes that can now be sent (A to B and B to A).  Add a third and it goes up to six, add a fourth and it increases to 12. By the time you add a fifth fax machine there are 20 different faxing possibilities. Buying a fax machine when there is already a large network of fax machines is far more valuable than buying the first. The value of the network grows as it gets bigger.

But there is a flip side  to the network effect. As networks grow in size and complexity, maintaining communication and coordinating activity becomes harder. If we were to frame this in terms of business, by the time you reach the status of ‘medium sized business’ and hire your 20th member of staff, you have created the potential for 380 different one on one interactions within your organisation. This means that for every message that is sent there are 379 opportunities for another message to conflict with yours.

Complexity grows exponentially as your business grows and as complexity increases communication suffers. That’s why we end up spending so much time in email and (often pointless) meetings. Research by organisations such as McKinseys and Harvard Business School indicate that in larger organisations, less than 45% of the average employee’s time is spent doing the work that matters to customers.

The rule of three and 10

Hiroshi Mikitani, the CEO of Japanese online retail giant Rakuten, came up with a rule that elegantly captures the challenge of growth. The rule of three and 10 simply stated is ‘Every time a company triples in size – Everything breaks’.

The processes and systems that work well for a sole operator won’t suit a team of three. What works for a team of three will be ultimately unsuitable for a team of 10, and if that team of 10 grows to 30 everything will break again.

Although the organisation only got three times bigger, at each point it becomes 10 times more complex and difficult to manage. This means that as the organisation grows, each member of staff spends more time managing (or being managed) and less time doing the work that matters.

The digital advantage

Thankfully, just as the industrial revolution created new ways to scale production, the digital revolution is creating solutions to address these information challenges.

The digital revolution is a broad shift away from people using predominantly analogue technologies such as pens, paper, typewriters and Australia Post to using Information Technologies such as apps, tablets, keyboards and email.

These Information Technologies, or I.T., have three distinct advantages over analogue technologies in terms of speed (information can be shared faster), cost (common processes can be automated), and accuracy (information is less likely to be misunderstood).

Put another way, digital is the antidote to things that are either slow, expensive or potentially wrong. All of which are considerable barriers to future growth.

If you represent a Not-for-Profit or values-driven business dealing with the challenges of growth, you might be interested in applying for the 2020 Digital Champions Club scholarships. The Digital Champions Club is where I help SMEs find and implement digital solutions to growth problems. If you don’t represent one of these types of organisations you might be interested in checking out the program anyway.

IT is not a cost centre

I have ranted before about the shortfalls of budgeting and how budgeting encourages us to think of projects in terms of cost rather than in terms of value creation. This is particularly troubling for parts of the organisation known as Corporate (or Shared) Services. Corporate Services generally include areas such as Legal, Human Resources, Procurement and IT. These services are necessary for the smooth operation of the business, but unlike Operations, they are generally not considered to be income generating. As they aren’t directly involved in income generation, they are often seen by the rest of the business as a necessary evil where their cost (and often their involvement) needs to be minimised (for IT this challenge is often particularly acute because in many large organisations the Head of IT reports into the CFO).

The problem with this approach is by focusing on cost minimisation, organisations inadvertently also reduce value generation.

In the modern workplace, technology improvements have become an increasingly fertile ground for innovation but ‘innovation’ is often in direct conflict to the IT department’s primary objective of platform stability and security. Perhaps the simplest definition of innovation is ‘change that creates value’, but change both contradicts the goal of stability and also necessarily comes with attached risk, and risk is often viewed in conflict with the goal of security.

This perceived conflict has created a certain inertia in how IT departments operate that somewhat ironically results in more but different types of risk. Organisations might think they are reducing short-term operational risk by focusing on stability and security, but in doing so they are creating medium-term implementation risks (as change shifts from being small, relatively simple and continuous to large, relatively complex and sporadic) and longer-term strategic risks (as competitors identify and implement technology innovations at a faster rate).

An alternative is to re position IT (and perhaps all corporate services) as innovation catalysts. Rather than passively waiting for people to tell them what they need, IT could be proactively engaging with the business to find out what could be done better (and then working in partnership to make it happen). I often talk of IT as being Digital Champions but like many terms that have entered our collective lexicon, its familiarity has led to it losing some of its meaning. A Digital Champion is someone who keeps abreast of emerging technology opportunities and then champions its potential within the organisation. Championing something is unavoidably and unashamedly proactive. It requires constant engagement, education and ultimately a sense of (shared) service.

If this feels like a seismic shift, it doesn’t need to be. Like any change it is best if it’s started small. It should not be focused on investing in or developing new platforms and instead aim to unlock the latent potential in the platforms an organisation has already invested in. Perhaps the biggest change requires is a change of mindset. Like other Corporate functions, IT are often treated as second class citizens, and as a result many have come to believe it. But by giving the IT team the tools and training, and subsequently the belief that they can drive innovation and add ridiculous amounts of value to the organisation, we can change this perception.

At the end of the day, the best way for IT departments to change the perception that they’re more than a cost centre is to prove it. All they need to do is take the time to understand people’s challenges and then share the know how they already have.  Person by person, team by team, department by department.

 

I’ll be hosting a two-day intensive program on 15-16 October in Sydney where we will take your champions through the process of identifying, investigating and delivering technology improvements with sustainable success. As a special offer, use the promo code INTENSIVE20 to avail of a 20% discount on the ticket price. Click here for tickets and further information on this insanely practical event. 

Some things are good in theory but better in practice

A couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to deliver a brand new keynote for the first time. As a professional speaker, a new keynote is like a newborn child. About 12 months ago, I was talking to my team and suggested we should try for another keynote. We already had a couple of keynotes that we loved and it was difficult to see how we were going to have time for another one. More content to change, more sleepless nights wondering if they’re OK, and ongoing concerns about how you will love them all equally. But once you have the idea in your head, it’s hard to shake. So after a couple more discussions we decided to take the leap and get serious about it.

Between that point of inception and the delivery date (which again, just like a newborn was also about nine months), it felt like this keynote could be anything it wanted to be — the possibilities were endless. But as the delivery date draws closer, the reality starts to kick in, your fears start to kick in.

What if it’s ugly? 

Will other people still love it? 

Will I still love it? 


What if I neglect it, and as it gets older it starts hanging out with the wrong sort of keynotes — the ones that mumble and are hard to understand. 


Or even worse, the boring ones that send everyone to sleep, or the weird looking ones with dot points all over their slides and who are always trying to say too much…

…hmmm, I think that analogy is done. Let’s move on.

This new keynote was called Thrive on Disruption and my idea was to explore the characteristics of organisations that not only propelled them to outperform their peers, but who (in doing so) often drove the disruption of whole industries or created entirely new ones. The good news was this related to a whole bunch of research I’d done as part of my Master of Leadership thesis a few years ago. The bad news was I had no idea about how to present such big and complex ideas in a truly engaging and meaningful way.

Enter storytelling

There is little doubt that the idea of corporate storytelling is having its day in the sun. Incredible books such as Hooked: How Leaders Connect, Engage and Inspire with Storytelling by Yamini Naidu and Gabrielle Dolan, as well as Gabrielle’s follow up book Stories for Work, and Shawn Callahan’s Putting Stories to Work (just to name a handful written in Melbourne) have all highlighted the power of storytelling in making ideas memorable and relatable and I was keen to see how I could use storytelling in my new keynote. So as part of the keynote development process, I worked with an incredible story crafter in Megan Davis to help design the narrative of the keynote.

The outcome was uncomfortable

Although I’ve read extensively on the power of storytelling and even engaged a story telling consultant to help me, the outcome (more so than the process) was incredibly challenging. In reflection, the biggest challenge was to my self-perception. I had felt that as a professional speaker I was meant to be the ‘expert’, someone with the answers, or at least, with thoughtful and thought provoking ideas to share. And yet, for the first 20 minutes of my new keynote I wasn’t going to share anything thoughtful at all. I wasn’t going to share any of my expertise. I was just going to tell a story of the time I went hiking in the mountains of New Zealand with seven friends (there is more to the story than this but I don’t want to ruin it for you). To say the least this felt incredibly awkward.

And yet it entirely worked

The saying goes that some things are good in theory but not so good in practice. I can only suggest that my experience of storytelling is entirely the opposite. Although I already knew that storytelling was good in theory, the experience in practice was far better than I could have imagined. Ultimately, the hiking story served as an easily understandable analogy for how organisations operate in disruptive and challenging environments. It provided a safe way for participants to reflect on their own organisation’s behaviours and practices, to better understand what is working and also what could be improved, and it provided a relatable way for sharing how cutting edge organisations operate differently. Finally, I think the story shed light on my own mistakes and my own vulnerabilities, which in turn perhaps made the ideas I did share more relatable and achievable. In hindsight, this is everything you get told about storytelling, but sometimes struggle to believe.

And why do I share this with you all? It’s not because I want you to use more story telling in your work, though I sincerely hope you do (and please check out some of the links to the great books and people above). It’s because theory and practice often bear little similarity to each other. It’s not just that some things are good in theory and yet bad in practice. It’s just as likely that something is bad in theory but good in practice or, as in this case, something I believed to be good in theory was in fact incredible in practice. Ultimately, the only thing that matters is practice, not theory. So if you really want to know if an idea is a good idea you need to stop reading about it and thinking about it…and actually do it.

Check out Simon’s LIVE Speaking Guide to get a taste for what he does or get in touch to discuss how he can add something special to your organisation’s next event.

Exploring your unknowns

I recently returned from an incredible adventure with my two girls sailing in the Kimberley region of the Western area. It is so remote that it took us nearly five days of sailing to get there and another five days to get home again. In between, we had some truly unique and special experiences that I have no doubt we will look back on for the rest of our lives.

We live in a world where genuine adventures seem to be harder and harder to come by. This is because a real sense of adventure requires certain elements to be present. First, there needs to be a sense of discovery, the ability to explore something unknown or experience something unfamiliar. Second, real adventure must contain an element of risk.

The challenge is that the unknown and the unfamiliar have become increasingly rare commodities in our world. Finding places that are truly off the beaten track has become harder as roads and transportation links have gotten better and information more freely available. We also live in an increasingly risk-averse society. Even if we go to visit a previously unexplored part of the world (or at least unexplored by us) we can pre-arrange accommodation and transfers, read reviews or book an all inclusive 10-day tour. Now I appreciate that there are a select few out there who shun such comforts but my feeling is that this has become very much the norm.

So in planning and preparing for this trip, and faced with this uncertainty, it was interesting to see how my girls responded. But perhaps what was most interesting was seeing an incredible parallel between how they responded and how people in business respond to the unfamiliar as well.

The first part of the response is an over-analysis and over-statement of risk. In our early family conversations there was a lot of concern about crocodiles, getting sea sick, falling over the side of the boat, getting sun burnt and even being bored on such a long trip. Some of these were genuine concerns and there was value in ensuring that high impact risks were adequately managed but it was also true that these risks were given significantly more air play that they ultimately warranted.

The second part of the response is to understate the benefits. Did we really need to go to such a remote and inhospitable place? Is it really THAT special? Wouldn’t they have just as much fun going camping? Again, some of these are reasonable questions to ask but the reality is without personal experience we generally struggle to imagine something dramatically different from what we already know.

The combination of these two responses is that by systematically overstating the risks and underestimating the benefits of doing things differently, we subtly reinforce the status quo. In fact ‘risk’ has increasingly become a rational for inaction even when the risks of inaction may in fact be higher than risks associated with well considered change.

I’ve written before about the trade off between execution risk and strategic risk. Change projects unavoidably carry with them a certain level of execution risk: the risk involved in moving from one way of doing things to another. But generally these types of risks can be contained and managed and as we do more change projects we get better at them and the risk reduces over time. On the other hand, the strategic risk associated with not changing –  the risk that our organisation becomes increasingly out of sync with its operating environment and no longer either provides the goods and services or operated in a way that the market values – is always going to be large and always going to be difficult to manage.

For me, this is the difference between improvement projects which involves small execution risks, and transformation project which involve large strategic risks. In fact research by McKinsey suggests that the strategic risks of transformation projects are so high that only 16% of them result in sustained change over the long term.

The truth is that although it might be more adventurous than most holidays, my sailing trip through the Kimberleys was not a trip into the complete unknown. I had been there once before myself, we were with my parents who had done the trip at least half a dozen times and while we were there we saw at least a dozen other boats go in and out of the King George River. In fact this reminds me of the quote by William Gibson ‘the future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed’. Although this was an adventure into the unknown for my two girls, it was something that many had already experienced (and survived) before them.

As I said, real adventure is hard to come by, but we don’t need to BASE jump into an active volcano to grow and learn as people and we don’t need to completely restructure our organisations to maintain our market relevance. We just need to be willing to continually push ourselves to take calculated risks and continue to explore our unknowns.

 

Whether you’re looking for one-off short courses or longer term support within a community of like-minded organisations, the Digital Champions Club is committed to helping its clients maximise the returns and avoid the risks of digital transformation.

I’ll be facilitating immersive two-day intensives on the dates listed below. In this insanely practical two-day program, you will not only learn the framework and a suite of simple tools for use back in your organisation, you will leave with a real world, value-adding project to complete over the next couple of months. 


Digital Champions Two-Day Intensive

 

4 – 5 SEPTEMBER | MELBOURNE
15 – 16 OCTOBER | SYDNEY

Click here for information and tickets