And the 2020 Digital Champions Club Scholarship winners are…

Each year the Digital Champions Club offers three 12-month scholarships to amazing organisations doing wonderful things in the community. This years winners are…

…drum roll please…

FirstChance, a Newcastle based not-for-profit who provides early intervention and support for children with disabilities or developmental delay, and their families.

and

Campbell Page, a national not-for-profit who provides employment support and services to people struggling to find and keep long term jobs.

We are incredibly excited to have both these wonderful organisations join the program in 2020.

You might have picked up that there were three scholarships but only two winners. Although we hoped to award three scholarships we couldn’t. Unfortunately we didn’t have a third applicant that measured up to our expectations in terms of preparation and commitment. And it’s what you say no to that ultimately determines success.

Which leads us on to this week’s blog.

The value of doing one thing well.

A year or so ago we did a bit of DIY around our house, one of the jobs on the list was repainting our staircase. We went and got the undercoat, the paint, brushes, and drop sheets and one weekend we started painting. Like with most jobs you do the easy bits first. On the first day we started with the undercoat, we painted the treads and the uprights but didn’t get around to cutting in around fittings and the bits close to the wall.

On the second day, well actually, we haven’t got to the second day yet. Our half painted stairs have sat in the same state for the last 12 months. We haven’t found time to finish the undercoat and we found out that the top coat needs four days without use to fully cure. We keep meaning to do it right before we go away for a weekend but then we get busy and it gets postponed until next time.

But have we really not had the time? Since starting the staircase we’ve managed to complete a whole bunch of other jobs around the house. We’ve gardened, weeded, moved bedrooms around, moved other furniture around, washed walls, cleaned gutters, put up shelves, washed windows, and moved more furniture (yes there is a pattern).

The world is full of half completed and poorly implemented projects because we’d rather find new easy things to do than finish the hard things in front of us.

For members of the Digital Champions Club there is rarely a shortage of improvements they could make, but if we try to do them all at the same time we won’t do any of them well. We will eventually succumb to human nature and stop doing the hard work that’s needed to finish projects. And unlike my half painted stairs that are still usable (just not very attractive) a half completed technology project has very little use at all.

That’s why we teach Champions to only take on two projects at a time and push back if they want to start a new one before the old ones are complete. There is far more value in doing one thing well than doing multiple things badly…just as there’s value in being able to heed your own advice.

The Paradox of Growth

Alongside profitability, growth is seen as a cornerstone of organisational success. Growth implies market fit — it indicates that the world wants more of what you do. Growth is generally seen as a desirable objective for CEOs and business leaders but there is an underlying paradox to business growth: the more you grow the harder it becomes to grow.

Initially, growth makes things easier. Organisations gain certain benefits as they scale (sometimes referred to as economies of scale). For example, materials can be bought cheaper, machinery and people can be better used, and overhead costs such as rent and utilities can be spread across greater output. All these factors serve to lower the cost of doing work, which in turn makes an organisation more competitive and, as a result, improves profitability.

These benefits generally kick in quickly but then slowly dissipate (you might get a 20% discount if you double an order but you don’t get a 40% discount if you quadruple it). On the other hand, the challenges of growth start slowly but then rise rapidly. These challenges (sometimes referred to as diseconomies of scale) include maintaining communication as an organisation grows, the problems of coordinating the work of more people, more layers of management and slower decision making, and the need for more reporting, checks and balances to ensure the right work is being done in the right way.

Research suggests that as organisations grow, they reach a tipping point where complexity starts growing faster than revenue which leads to decreasing productivity, falling profits, overworked employees, and growing frustration for business owners. Eventually, they reach a point where the cost is greater than what people will pay and there is no point in the organisation growing further.

Unless…

…it can push out the point where things get harder. Obviously some organisations grow very big and very profitable, but they don’t achieve this using the same systems and processes they used when they were small. If an organisation wants to grow to its full potential it will eventually need to rethink how it does its work. Key to this renewal is bringing in the technology solutions that automate, simplify, and streamline work, allowing for further growth without increased headcount and the complexity and challenges it brings with it.

Ideally, this isn’t done when everything is already broken but done on a continual basis. Rather than identifying and fixing the things that are already broken, a continuous approach allows organisations to prepare in advance for the processes and tools they might need in the future. Perhaps the biggest challenges for growing organisations is finding the time and resources to do this proactively. This can be a real challenge when people are already feeling stretched, but committing the time up front is almost always less costly than dealing with the consequences later.

If your organisation is experiencing growing pains and you want to do something about it, consider the benefits of joining The Digital Champions Club, a community of practice that shows you all the tools you need to leverage growth through better technology use.